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Welcome to Outer Space View

Welcome to Outer Space View.

Editor’s note.:  Starting today, you can now explore the International Space Station in Street View in Google Maps. Thomas Pesquet. Astronaut at the European Space Agency (ESA). Spent six months aboard the International Space Station (ISS) as a flight engineer. He returned to Earth in June 2017. And in this post he tells us about what it’s like to live on the ISS. And his experience capturing Street View imagery in zero gravity.  

Welcome to Outer Space View

In the six months that I spent on the International Space Station. It was difficult to find the words or take a picture that accurately describes the feeling of being in space. Working with Google on my latest mission. I captured Street View imagery to show what the ISS looks like from the inside. And share what it’s like to look down on Earth from outer space.

Welcome to Outer Space

Cupola Observation Module

For 16 years, astronauts have been working and living on the ISS. A structure made up of 15 connected modules that floats 250 miles above Earth. The ISS acts as a base for space exploration possible future missions to the Moon,Mars and asteroids—and gives us a unique perspective on Earth itself. We can collect data on the Earth’s oceans. Atmosphere. And land surface. We can conduct experiments and studies that we wouldn’t be able to do from Earth. Like monitoring how the human body reacts to microgravity. Solving mysteries of the immune system. Studying  cyclones in order to alert populations. And governments when a storm is approaching, or monitoring marine litter—the rapidly increasing amount of waste found in our oceans.

Welcome to Outer Space View

Welcome to Outer Space

US Laboratory Module

There were a few “firsts” on my mission. It was led by Peggy Whitson who. At age 56. Became the oldest woman to fly into space and the first woman in history to command two expeditions. The mission was the first time Street View imagery was captured beyond planet Earth, and the first time annotations helpful little notes that pop up as you explore the ISS have been added to the imagery. They provide additional information or fun facts like where we work out to stay physically fit. What kind of food we eat. And where we conduct scientific experiments.

Welcome to Outer Space

Node 1 (Unity) Peggy Whitson and friends dining at the galley table – big enough for six astronauts.

Because of the particular constraints of living and working in space, it wasn’t possible to collect Street View using Google’s usual methods. Instead. The Street View team worked with NASA at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. Texas and Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville. Alabama to design a gravity-free method of collecting the imagery using DSLR cameras. And equipment already on the ISS. Then I collected still photos in space. That were sent down to Earth where they were stitched together to create panoramic 360 degree imagery of the ISS.

Welcome to Outer Space

Node 2 (Harmony) Crew Quarters – Astronaut Sandra Magnus, Expedition 18 flight engineer, poses for a photo in her crew compartment.

We did a lot of troubleshooting before collecting the final imagery that you see today in Street View. The ISS has technical equipment on all surfaces, with lots of cables and a complicated layout with modules shooting off in all directions left. Right, up, down. And it’s a busy place. With six crew members carrying out research and maintenance activities 12 hours a day. There are a lot of obstacles up there, and we had limited time to capture the imagery. So we had to be confident that our approach would work. Oh, and there’s that whole zero gravity thing.

Welcome to Outer Space

Joint Airlock (Quest) – This area contains space suits also known as Extravehicular Mobility Units.  

They provide crew members with life support that enables extravehicular activity.

None of this would have been possible without the work of the team on the ground. My colleagues (turned roommates) on the ISS. And the countries that came together to send us up to space. Looking at Earth from above made me think about my own world a little differently, and I hope that the ISS on Street View changes your view of the world too.

Click here to go behind the scenes with Thomas and the team.

Earthtopomaps

Welcome to Outer Space View

Studying  cyclones in order to alert populations. And governments when a storm is approaching, or monitoring marine litter—the rapidly increasing amount of waste found in our oceans. Because of the particular constraints of living and working in space, it wasn’t possible to collect Street View using Google’s usual methods. Instead. Then I collected still photos in space. We did a lot of troubleshooting before collecting the final imagery that you see today in Street View. So we had to be confident that our approach would work.

Studying  cyclones in order to alert populations. And governments when a storm is approaching, or monitoring marine litter—the rapidly increasing amount of waste found in our oceans. Because of the particular constraints of living and working in space, it wasn’t possible to collect Street View using Google’s usual methods. Instead. Then I collected still photos in space. We did a lot of troubleshooting before collecting the final imagery that you see today in Street View. So we had to be confident that our approach would work.

Studying  cyclones in order to alert populations.

And governments when a storm is approaching, or monitoring marine litter—the rapidly increasing amount of waste found in our oceans. Because of the particular constraints of living and working in space, it wasn’t possible to collect Street View using Google’s usual methods. Instead. Then I collected still photos in space. We did a lot of troubleshooting before collecting the final imagery that you see today in Street View. So we had to be confident that our approach would work.

Studying  cyclones in order to alert populations. And governments when a storm is approaching, or monitoring marine litter—the rapidly increasing amount of waste found in our oceans. Because of the particular constraints of living and working in space, it wasn’t possible to collect Street View using Google’s usual methods. Instead. Then I collected still photos in space. We did a lot of troubleshooting before collecting the final imagery that you see today in Street View. So we had to be confident that our approach would work.

Journey under the Earth s surface in Street View

Journey under the Earth s surface in Street View

Journey under the Earth

More than a thousand miles off the coast of Australia is the remote country of Vanuatu. An archipelago of 80 tiny islands brimming with lush green jungles. Pristine black sand beaches. And nine erupting volcanoes.

Journey under the Earth

Walk the beaches of Ambrym 

Starting today in Google Maps, we invite you to join us on a journey to the edge of one of the largest boiling lava lakes in the world on the Vanuatuan island of Ambrym. To get  inside  the active volcano, we partnered with explorers. Geoff Mackley and Chris Horsley. Who rappelled 400 meters into the Marum crater with a Street View Trekker collecting 360-degree imagery of the journey down to the molten lava lake, which is roughly the size of two football fields. 

You only realize how insignificant humans are when you’re standing next to a giant lake of fiery boiling rock. Geoff Mackley

Marum Lava Lake 

“Standing at the edge and feeling the heat lick your skin is phenomenal”. Said Chris Horsley after returning from his descent into the crater. “I hope that by putting this place on the map people will realize what a beautiful world we live in.”

Journey under the Earth

Marum Lava Lake

Journey under the Earth s surface in Street View 

Ambrym is defined by the desolate 39 square mile volcanic caldera hosting two active volcanic cones called Benbow and Marum. But the tropical island is also home to more than 7,000 people who live in the rainforest down the mountain. While the volcano has played a significant role in defining their history due to unpredictable eruptions and influence on agriculture and environment. They’ve learned to live in harmony with this beautiful yet deadly natural phenomena.

Journey under the Earth

Chief Moses in the local village of Endu explains. “We believe that the volcanoes Marum and Benbow are devils.

If you go up to a volcano you have to be very careful because the two volcanoes could get angry at any time. We believe that Benbo is the husband. And Marum is the wife. Sometimes when they don’t agree there’s an eruption which means the spirit is angry so we sacrifice a pig or fawel to the volcano.” As part of the Google Maps journey. Chief Moses of Endu invites you to take a walk through his village and hopes you’ll be inspired to visit this sacred place he calls home. Following Cyclone Pam a few years ago.

Journey under the Earth s surface in Street View

The country has been rebuilding its infrastructure. Now Chief Moses and his village are ready to welcome travelers back to Vanuatu to experience its stunning beauty and learn about its cultural traditions. He believes making Vanuatu more accessible to the world is a key step in the island’s recovery and ability to  establish a sustainable economy and preserve its culture.

Journey under the Earth

Village of Endu

Journey under the Earth s surface in Street View

In Street View you can wander the streets of 81 countries. And visit incredible historical and natural sites around the world like the Samburu National Park in Kenya, The Grand Canyon. Or  New Zealand’s Great Walks. Today, for the first time. Street View is going beneath the surface and into the heart of the earth enjoy exploring. Vanuatu’s Marum Crater and Endu village at Ambrym.

Earthtopomaps.com

More than a thousand miles off the coast of Australia is the remote country of Vanuatu. You only realize how insignificant humans. Are when you’re standing next to a giant lake of fiery boiling rock. But the tropical island is also home to more than 7,000 people who live in the rainforest down the mountain. While the volcano has played a significant role in defining their history due to unpredictable. Eruptions and influence on agriculture and environment.

More than a thousand miles off the coast of Australia is the remote country of Vanuatu. You only realize how insignificant humans. Are when you’re standing next to a giant lake of fiery boiling rock. But the tropical island is also home to more than 7,000 people who live in the rainforest down the mountain. While the volcano has played a significant role in defining their history due to unpredictable. Eruptions and influence on agriculture and environment.

If you go up to a volcano you have to be very careful because the two volcanoes could get angry at any time. Sometimes when they don’t agree there’s an eruption which means the spirit is angry so we sacrifice a pig or fawel to the volcano.”

More than a thousand miles off the coast of Australia is the remote country of Vanuatu. You only realize how insignificant humans. Are when you’re standing next to a giant lake of fiery boiling rock. But the tropical island is also home to more than 7,000 people who live in the rainforest down the mountain. While the volcano has played a significant role in defining their history due to unpredictable. Eruptions and influence on agriculture and environment.

If you go up to a volcano you have to be very careful because the two volcanoes could get angry at any time. Sometimes when they don’t agree there’s an eruption which means the spirit is angry so we sacrifice a pig or fawel to the volcano.”

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