satellite view

Tips for learning at home with Google Earth

Tips for learning at home with Google Earth

tips for learning

Tips for learning at home with Google Earth

I’m an aunt to eight nieces and nephews, who over the past few weeks transitioned to distance learning. I also have a sister who works in Special Education and now spends half of her time meeting directly with parents. Creating strategies to modify coursework. And ensuring that families have the tech to support academic progress.

  • It hasn’t been an easy adjustment, but my family is one of the many using different tools to connect with their classrooms and stay busy.

With millions of students out of school due to COVID-19, educators are rising to the challenge of teaching remotely at an unprecedented scale. And parents are putting in extra time to support their kids with productive learning sessions. Adults, too, are looking to learn new things and explore the world around them from home.

While there are many resources for distance learning for both kids and adults—such as Google’s new information hub Teach from Home and the. Learn@Home YouTube channel sometimes all you need is a quick activity that doesn’t require much prep. And one place you’re sure to find that is Google Earth.

Here are four easy ways anyone can use Google Earth as a learning tool or even simply to experience new places and adventures while staying safe at home.

Take a spin around the globe with the “I’m Feeling Lucky” button

Google Earth’s “I’m Feeling Lucky” feature recreates the feeling of spinning a globe and dropping your finger down somewhere unexpected. With a click of the “dice” button. You can learn about the world and travel to unexpected destinations.

tips for learning

Uncover hidden gems the world over with “I’m Feeling lucky,” a feature that takes you somewhere unexpected with the click of a button.

Measure the world 

If you’ve ever wondered how far your home is from Machu Picchu or what the nautical miles between Easter Island and Hawaii are. You’re in luck. With Google Earth’s measure tool. You can easily discover the distance between locations, along paths and the area of places. Challenge yourself by changing the unit of measurement, perhaps to a smoot. And figure out how long it would take for you to walk, boogie, swim, paddle or fly to a place you love.

tips for learning

Use lines and shapes to check distances and estimate sizes of different features on Earth

Explore Google Earth Voyager games and imagery

How well do you know the world’s national parks? What about the sound a penguin makes? With a few clicks. You can test your knowledge  on national parks, animal sounds or space exploration. You can even travel the world with Carmen Sandiego.

tips for learning

Join Carmen Sandiego in a globe-trotting game and learn about new places, cultures and customs

Students can also try a round of Earth Bingo or discover the ABCs using satellite imagery. Also, think about using Street View to put a digital spin on the game “I spy with my little eye”. And look for objects in the online version of students’ streets and neighborhoods. Or take the classic game for an artistic spin inside of a museum.

Tips for learning at home with Google Earth

Visit Google’s education partner websites

Many of the authors of our Voyager stories have free online resources and activities that use Google Earth. Students can hone their geo-literacy skills and gain inspiration with National Geographic. A click of the “Share to Google Classroom” button will bring PBS Learning Media’s collection of World Explorers videos and lesson plans to an entire classroom.

Media4Math has developed a collection of resources that give mathematical principles real world context. Such as the geometry of castles and circular structures.

tips for learning

Learn how triangles are incorporated into famous buildings

Tips for learning at home with Google Earth

Once you’ve learned about shapes, move onto sound, with the Global Oneness Project curriculum that explores the linguistic diversity and vitality of indigenous languages from speakers around the world. The curriculum is a companion to the Google Earth audio collection, Celebrating Indigenous Languages.

Tips for learning at home with Google Earth

You can find more Google Earth resources and classroom activities on the Google Earth Education website, as well as TES, a resource hub with plenty of home learning essentials. Educators looking to connect with other teachers to share ideas on using Google Earth and mapping tools in the classroom can check out the new Google Earth Education Community Forum, and continue to follow Google Earth on Twitter and Facebook.

tips for learning

POSTED IN

Earthtopomaps

https://earthtopomaps.com/

You can find more Google Earth resources and classroom activities on the Google Earth Education website, as well as TES. A resource hub with plenty of home learning essentials.

yYou can find more Google Earth resources and classroom activities on the Google Earth Education website, as well as TES. A resource hub with plenty of home learning essentials.

zYou can find more Google Earth resources and classroom activities on the Google Earth Education website. As well as TES. A resource hub with plenty of home learning essentials.

It hasn’t been an easy adjustment. But my family is one of the many using different tools to connect with their classrooms and stay busy.

aYou can find more Google Earth resources and classroom activities on the Google Earth Education website, as well as TES.

bYou can find more Google Earth resources and classroom activities on the Google Earth Education website, as well as TES.

cYou can find more Google Earth resources and classroom activities on the Google Earth Education website, as well as TES.

https://www.youtube.com/googleearth

Time flies in Google Earth’s biggest update in years

Time flies in Google Earth’s biggest update in years

Time flies in Google

Read this post in Spanish. // Blog en español aquí.

In the biggest update to Google Earth since 2017. You can now see our planet in an entirely new dimension — time. With Timelapse in Google Earth. 24 million satellite photos from the past 37 years have been compiled into an interactive 4D experience. Now anyone can watch time unfold and witness nearly four decades of planetary change.

Time flies in Google Earth’s biggest update in years

For the past 15 years. Billions of people have turned to Google Earth to explore our planet from endless vantage points. You might have peeked at Mount Everest or flown through your hometown. Since launching Google Earth. We’ve focused on creating a 3D replica of the world that reflects our planet in magnificent detail with features that both entertain and empower everyone to create positive change.

Our planet has seen rapid environmental change in the past half-century — more than any other point in human history. Many of us have experienced these changes in our own communities. I myself was among the thousands of Californians evacuated from their homes during the state’s wildfires last year. For other people. The effects of climate change feel abstract and far away, like melting ice caps and receding glaciers. With Timelapse in Google Earth, we have a clearer picture of our changing planet right at our fingertips one that shows not just problems but also solutions. As well as mesmerizingly beautiful natural phenomena that unfold over decades.

Time flies in Google

To explore Timelapse in Google Earth. Go to g.co/Timelapse  you can use the handy search bar to choose any place on the planet where you want to see time in motion.

Time flies in Google Earths biggest update in years

Or open Google Earth and click on the ship’s wheel to find Timelapse in our storytelling platform, Voyager, to see interactive guided tours. We’ve also uploaded more than 800 Timelapse videos in both 2D and 3D for public use at g.co/TimelapseVideos. You can select any video you want as a ready-to-use MP4 video or sit back and watch the videos on YouTube. From governments and researchers to publishers. Teachers and advocates, we’re excited to see how people will use Timelapse in Google Earth to shine a light on our planet. 

  • Rondônia. Brazil has changed over time, but with minimal effect on the rainforest that surrounds it. See the difference the Suruí people have made through their protection of the Amazon rainforest they call home in Rondônia, Brazil. 
  • Understand the causes of Earth’s change 

We worked with experts at Carnegie Mellon University’s CREATE Lab to create the technology behind Timelapse. And we worked with them again to make sense of what we were seeing. 
As we looked at what was happening. Five themes emerged: forest change, urban growth, warming temperatures. Sources of energy, and our world’s fragile beauty. Google Earth takes you on a guided tour of each topic to better understand them. 

Timelapse in Google Earth shows the rapid change on our planet in context through five thematic stories. For example, the retreat of the Columbia Glacier in Alaska is captured in the “Warming Planet” tour.

Putting time on Earth in the palm of our hand

Making a planet-sized timelapse video required a significant amount of what we call “pixel crunching” in Earth Engine. Google’s cloud platform for geospatial analysis. To add animated Timelapse imagery to Google Earth. we gathered more than 24 million satellite images from 1984 to 2020, representing quadrillions of pixels. It took more than two million processing hours across thousands of machines in Google Cloud to compile 20 petabytes of satellite imagery into a single 4.4 terapixel-sized video mosaic that’s the equivalent of 530,000 videos in 4K resolution! And all this computing was done inside our carbon-neutral, 100% renewable energy-matched data centers, which are part of our commitments to help build a carbon-free future. 

As far as we know, Timelapse in Google Earth is the largest video on the planet, of our planet. And creating it required out-of-this-world collaboration. This work was possible because of the U.S. government and European Union’s commitments to open and accessible data. Not to mention their herculean efforts to launch rockets. Rovers. Satellites and astronauts into space in the spirit of knowledge and exploration. Timelapse in Google Earth simply wouldn’t have been possible without NASA and the United States Geological Survey’s Landsat program, the world’s first (and longest-running) civilian Earth observation program, and the European Union’s Copernicus program with its Sentinel satellites.

Time flies in Google Earths biggest update in years

We invite anyone to take Timelapse into their own hands and share it with others — whether you’re marveling at changing coastlines, following the growth of megacities, or tracking deforestation. Timelapse in Google Earth is about zooming out to assess the health and well-being of our only home, and is a tool that can educate and inspire action. 

Visual evidence can cut to the core of the debate in a way that words cannot and communicate complex issues to everyone. Take, for example, the work of Liza Goldberg who plans to use Timelapse imagery to teach climate change. Or the 2020 award-winning documentary “Nature Now” that uses satellite imagery to show humanity’s growing footprint on the planet.

Timelapse for the next decade to come

In collaboration with our partners. We’ll update Google Earth annually with new Timelapse imagery throughout the next decade. We hope that this perspective of the planet will ground debates. Encourage discovery and shift perspectives about some of our most pressing global issues.

Earthtopomaps

Earthtopomaps

We invite anyone to take Timelapse into their own hands and share it with others — whether you’re marveling at changing coastlines, following the growth of megacities, or tracking deforestation.

dThis work was possible because of the U.S. government and European Union’s commitments to open and accessible data. Not to mention their herculean efforts to launch rockets.

eThis work was possible because of the U.S. government and European Union’s commitments to open and accessible data. Not to mention their herculean efforts to launch rockets.

fThis work was possible because of the U.S. government and European Union’s commitments to open and accessible data. Not to mention their herculean efforts to launch rockets.

This archaeologist fights tomb raiders with Google Earth

This archaeologist fights tomb raiders with Google Earth

This archaeologist fights

In the summer, Dr. Gino Caspari’s day starts at 5:30 a.m. in Siberia. Where he studies the ancient Scythians with the Swiss National Science Foundation. There, he looks for burial places of these nomadic warriors who rode through Asia 2,500 years ago. The work isn’t easy. From dealing with extreme temperatures, to swamps covered with mosquitos. But the biggest challenge is staying one step ahead of tomb raiders.

  • This archaeologist fights tomb raiders with Google Earth

But Gino is looking for the thousands he believes remain scattered across Russia, Mongolia and Western China. To track his progress. He began mapping these burial sites using Google Earth. “There’s a plethora of open data sources out there. But most of them don’t have the resolution necessary to detect individual archaeological structures,” Dr. Caspari says. Pointing out that getting quality data is also very expensive. “Google Earth updates high-res data across the globe. And, especially in remote regions. It was a windfall for archaeologists. Google Earth expanded our possibilities to plan surveys and understand cultural heritage on a broader geographic scale.”

While Google Earth helped Dr. Caspari plan his expeditions, he still couldn’t stay ahead of the looters. He needed to get there faster.

That’s when he met data scientist Pablo Crespo and started using another Google tool, TensorFlow.

“Since I started my PhD in 2013. Back then, he tried some simple automatization processes to detect the places he needed for his research with the available technology. But only got limited results. In 2020, though, Gino and Pablo created a machine learning model using TensorFlow that could analyze satellite images they pulled from Google Earth. This model would look for places on the images that had the characteristics of a Scythian tomb.

The progress in the field of machine learning has been insanely fast, improving the quality of classification and detection to a point where it has become much more than just a theoretical possibility. Google’s freely available technologies have help

This archaeologist fights tomb raiders with Google Earth

This technology sped up the discovery process for Gino, giving him an advantage over looters and even deterioration caused by climate change.

Gino says. “As a young scholar, I just lack the funds to access a lot of the resources I need. Working with Pablo and others has widened my perspective on what is possible and where we can go.”

Technology solutions have given Dr. Caspari’s work a new set of capabilities, supercharging what he’s able to do.

à And it’s also made him appreciate the importance of the human touch. “The deeper we dive into our past with the help of technology, the more apparent it becomes how patchy and incomplete our knowledge really is.” he says. “Technology often serves as an extension of our senses and mitigates our reality. Weaving the fabric of our reality will remain the task of the storyteller in us.

Free Download File KML and KMZ for Google Earth

Earthtopomaps

https://earthtopomaps.com/

https://googleearth.gosur.com/

And it’s also made him appreciate the importance of the human touch.

And it’s also made him appreciate the importance of the human touch.

Translate »
view satellite
%d bloggers like this: