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Pyramids of Meroë The Pyramids of Meroë in Sudan

Pyramids of Meroë The Pyramids of Meroë in Sudan

Pyramids of Meroe
pyramids of meroë

May 2022 | By Google EMEA Brand Studio

Uncover a city with over 200 pyramids, in Sudan’s Nile Valley

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pyramids of meroë

Pyramids of Meroë The Pyramids of Meroë in Sudan

pyramids of meroë
pyramids of meroë

Pyramids of Meroë The Pyramids of Meroë in Sudan

While lesser known than Egypt’s Pyramids of Giza or the Mayan Temples of Guatemala. Are no less remarkable. This ancient capital of the Kushite Kingdom is home to over 200 pyramids the most pyramids in a single place in the entire world. Explore this UNESCO world heritage site in detail through 3D models. WebXR and Street View. And learn more about the civilization that built it. Who ruled the lands of Nubia for over 3000 years

Earthtopomaps.com

fWhile lesser known than Egypt’s Pyramids of Giza or the Mayan Temples of Guatemala. Are no less remarkable. This ancient capital of the Kushite Kingdom is home to over 200 pyramids the most pyramids in a single place in the entire world. Explore this UNESCO world heritage site in detail through 3D models. WebXR and Street View. And learn more about the civilization that built it. Who ruled the lands of Nubia for over 3000 years

gWhile lesser known than Egypt’s Pyramids of Giza or the Mayan Temples of Guatemala. hAre no less remarkable.

While lesser known than Egypt’s Pyramids of Giza or the Mayan Temples of Guatemala. iAre no less remarkable.

jWhile lesser known than Egypt’s Pyramids of Giza or the Mayan Temples of Guatemala. kAre no less remarkable.

lWhile lesser known than Egypt’s Pyramids of Giza or the Mayan Temples of Guatemala. mAre no less remarkable.

xPyramids of Meroë The Pyramids of Meroë in Sudan

nWhile lesser known than Egypt’s Pyramids of Giza or the Mayan Temples of Guatemala. oAre no less remarkable.

pWhile lesser known than Egypt’s Pyramids of Giza or the Mayan Temples of Guatemala. qAre no less remarkable.

uWhile lesser known than Egypt’s Pyramids of Giza or the Mayan Temples of Guatemala. Are no less remarkable.

Pyramids of Meroë The Pyramids of Meroë in Sudan

rWhile lesser known than Egypt’s Pyramids of Giza or the Mayan Temples of Guatemala. sAre no less remarkable.

tThis ancient capital of the Kushite Kingdom is home to over 200 pyramids the most pyramids in a single place in the entire world. Explore this UNESCO world heritage site in detail through 3D models. WebXR and Street View. And learn more about the civilization that built it. Who ruled the lands of Nubia for over 3000 years

While lesser known than Egypt’s Pyramids of Giza or the Mayan Temples of Guatemala.

While lesser known than Egypt’s Pyramids of Giza or the Mayan Temples of Guatemala.

Step into the Meroë pyramids with Google

Step into the Meroë pyramids with Google

  • A user searches Google for the pyramids of meroe, then places an Augmented Reality model in front of themSearch for “pyramids of meroe” to explore a pyramid up close in Augmented Reality
Step into the
Step into the

When you think of pyramids does your mind wander to the Pyramids of Giza in Egypt or the Mayan Temples of Guatemala?. Great civilizations built each of these pyramids and inscribed their stories onto the walls of them. Offering glimpses into their daily life.

The Pyramids of Meroë in Sudan, while lesser known. Are no different. Today. you can explore these stunning pyramids. Which are a UNESCO World Heritage site. On Google Arts & Culture.

aStep into the Meroë pyramids with Google

Over 200 pyramids were constructed in Meroë. The third and final capital of the Kushite Kingdom. An ancient African civilization that ruled the lands of Nubia for over 3000 years. Now you can take a virtual walk through the Pyramids of Meroë and explore the inscriptions using Street View’s panoramic imagery. You can also learn more about the Kushite Kingdom.

Their royalty and the architecture behind the pyramids in an immersive web experience that’s available in a range of languages including Arabic. English. French. German and Spanish.

  • A user searches Google for the pyramids of meroe. Then places an Augmented Reality model in front of themSearch for “pyramids of meroe”. To explore a pyramid up close in Augmented Reality

If you want to get even more up close and personal. You can visualize the pyramids using augmented reality no matter where you are.

bStep into the Meroë pyramids with Google

You can also listen to acclaimed Sudanese American poet Emi Mahmoud. Share evocative rhymes that are a beautiful ode to her homeland and to this project that shares Sudan’s rich heritage with others.

We’ve also partnered with the United Nations Economic and Social Council (UNESCO) to bring you more information about Meroë, Gebel Barkal and Napatan region and Sudan’s 

Sanganeb Marine National Park.

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Earthtopomaps.com

https://www.youtube.com/googleearth

If you want to get even more up close and personal, you can visualize the pyramids using augmented reality no matter where you are.

Step into the Meroë pyramids with Google

You can also listen to acclaimed Sudanese American. Poet Emi Mahmoud share evocative rhymes. That are a beautiful ode to her homeland and to this project that shares Sudan’s rich heritage with others.

Step into the Meroë pyramids with Google

cIf you want to get even more up close and personal, you can visualize the pyramids using augmented reality no matter where you are.

dIf you want to get even more up close and personal, you can visualize the pyramids using augmented reality no matter where you are.

eIf you want to get even more up close and personal, you can visualize the pyramids using augmented reality no matter where you are.

eIf you want to get even more up close and personal, you can visualize the pyramids using augmented reality no matter where you are.

Source: The Keyword

Explore new sites relive old hikes for National Park Week

Explore new sites relive old hikes for National Park Week

Molly McHugh-Johnson

explore new sites relive

Every year, I try to visit a new National Park, or at least start planning my trip to one. That’s a little more difficult right now, but given that it’s National Park Week, I decided to try and keep with my tradition by using Google tools to satisfy my wanderlust.

Explore new places and parks

This year, I’m heading to g.co/nationalparks, a Google Arts & Culture project developed in collaboration with National Park Service that takes you on guided tours narrated by park rangers from the Kenai Fjords. Hawai’i Volcanoes, Carlsbad Caverns. Bryce Canyon and Dry Tortugas. I can also visit historical sites that I’ve never been to before. Like Eleanor Roosevelt’s woodsy home in Hyde Park, New York or Thomas Edison’s camping sites (which, to me, look a little more like glamping). There are more than 100 Street View historical tours to choose from. And collections that let you discover Native American craft work or fossils from archeological digs. 

Afterward, I’ll take an in-depth tour of some of the National Parks of the United States and wander through a few of the most-loved ones recommended by our community of Local Guides in two popular Google Earth Voyager stories. I plan on rounding out the week with a new YouTube series from the Google Earth team that travels to National Parks across the country. Literally “zooming” you into places like Elephant Hill in Canyonlands National Park and Kanarraville Falls in Zion National Park. There’s even a new Global National Parks quiz to test your geo-knowledge.

explore new sites relive

All of these things help an outdoor enthusiast who’s stuck inside (for the time being). to find unknown landscapes or get inspiration for their next trip. Perhaps for the most well-traveled out there. They’re a way to remember a favorite adventure. 

Or revisit old favorites

Before I venture into the unknown. I decided to take a trip down memory lane (or rather, memory trail). And re-experience some of my favorite hikes in National Parks with the help of Google Street View. And anyone can join me—starting with Bright Angel Trail in the Grand Canyon. Saving the uphill journey for the second half of a hike is something my legs will never forget. But it remains one of my favorite National Parks memories. And thanks to Street View. I can recreate the journey … with fewer water breaks, probably.

Explore new sites relive old hikes for National Park Week

I can also make my way up Garfield Peak in Crater Lake National Park (which I hiked during a camping trip where I first met my husband) and make as many nostalgic pit stops along the way as I want.

And last summer. My family and I all vacationed in Acadia National Park. Now that we can’t physically see one another. I’m even more grateful we went. One of my favorite memories was hiking along the park’s easternmost edge. The Great Head Trail. with my husband and meeting my family on Sand Beach.

A journey I’m happily retaking via Street View … and maybe on our weekly family video call, we’ll all “hike” it together.

I try to visit a new National Park

https://earthtopomaps.com/

All of these things help an outdoor enthusiast who’s stuck inside. (For the time being). to find unknown landscapes or get inspiration for their next trip.

And last summer. My family and I all vacationed in Acadia National Park. Now that we can’t physically see one another. I’m even more grateful we went.

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Source: The Keyword

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