Bringing the solar system to life in 3D with NASA

Bringing the solar system to life in 3D with NASA.

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The solar system has always been “teaching” us. You can see it in the drawings of the constellations in the Lascaux Caves. And the astronomy of the ancient world all the way up to now. When NASA is helping people around the world to get a closer look at the universe through explorations like the Artemis moon mission or the new James Webb Space images. Starting today. You can learn even more from the solar system with new experiences on Google Search and Google Arts & Culture. Thanks to NASA.

NASA and Google Arts & Culture have partnered to bring more than 60 3D models of planets. Moons and NASA spacecraft to Google Search. When you use Google Search to learn about these topics. Just click on the View in 3D button to understand the different elements of what you’re looking at even better. These 3D annotations will also be available for cells. Biological concepts (like skeletal systems). And other educational models on Search.

Bringing the solar system to life in 3D with NASA.

  • An image of the moon with a map of where Apollo 11 landedSee the Moon and check the Apollo 11 landing site.
Bringing the solar system
Bringing the solar system
Bringing the solar system

And, when you are on your mobile phone, you can even use Augmented Reality to project these models into your space.

Bringing the solar system
Bringing the solar system

And, when you are on your mobile phone, you can even use Augmented Reality to project these models into your space.

Bringing the solar system to life in 3D with NASA

See the Earth and other planets in your space.

You can also dive deeper into these celestial bodies. And learn about the scientific instruments NASA uses to study them. A new Google Arts & Culture project lets you explore the solar system. With stories about diamond rain on Neptune. Gas giants and dwarf planets. Saturn’s moons. And NASA missions like the Parker Solar Probe or Landsat. NASA will even take you on a tour of the Hubble Telescope’s greatest images. Show you what makes the International Space Station so extraordinary. And help you discover how the Mars Perseverance Rover is revealing our place in the universe.

  • an image of the planets with the text “Our solar system”Do you know which is the smallest planet in the Solar System and the closest to the Sun? Learn more here.

The experience is also a way of helping inspire future students who may be considering careers as our next generation of explorers. As Kris Brown, NASA’s Deputy Associate Administrator for STEM Engagement notes. “Our nation’s future in air and space starts with inspiring students. And igniting a spark of curiosity in STEM in today’s classrooms. The ability to see our solar system. And join missions like the James Webb Space Telescope in 3D will give students a unique perspective of space and, hopefully, engage them in expanding their understanding of our home planet and our place in the universe. We hope these students will begin a journey of learning on STEM pathways toward building our next generation of explorers.”

So whether you’re a student learning about the solar system. Or just want to get up close to the moon. We are thrilled to help NASA put the planets in the palm of your hand.

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And, when you are on your mobile phone, you can even use Augmented Reality to project these models into your space.

When NASA is helping people around the world to get a closer look at the universe through explorations like the Artemis moon mission or the new James Webb Space images. You can learn even more from the solar system with new experiences on Google Search and Google Arts & Culture. NASA and Google Arts & Culture have partnered to bring more than 60 3D models of planets. When you use Google Search to learn about these topics. These 3D annotations will also be available for cells.

When NASA is helping people around the world to get a closer look at the universe through explorations like the Artemis moon mission or the new James Webb Space images. You can learn even more from the solar system with new experiences on Google Search and Google Arts & Culture. NASA and Google Arts & Culture have partnered to bring more than 60 3D models of planets. When you use Google Search to learn about these topics. These 3D annotations will also be available for cells.

After school This teen tracks climate change with NASA.

After school This teen tracks climate change with NASA.

After school This teen

Editor’s Note: Liza Goldberg is a 17-year-old scientist interning at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Biospheric Sciences Lab. Today, she shares how Google Earth Engine helps her monitor mangroves. Which are ecosystems vital to the sustainability of coastal communities around the world.  

I first heard the words “climate change” when I was 9. As a fourth grade student in Maryland. My class studied the local Chesapeake Bay;. We raised horseshoe crabs and observed the effects of extreme weather and sea level rise on the ecosystem. After studying the human environment interactions in my community and the broader region. I decided I wanted to dedicate my life to curbing climate change.

After school This teen tracks climate change with NASA.

Two years later. I began a science fair project to study the impacts of simulated warming on the carbon dioxide exchange of red maple saplings. Every weekend for three years. I used a gas analyzer to test eight trees I planted in my backyard. And submitted the project to a local fair. I explained my research to a judge. Who connected me with scientists in NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Biospheric Sciences Lab. Thanks to that connection, I went from testing saplings in my backyard to working with a world renowned team of forest change scientists at age 14.

After school This teen

Building the artificial warming chambers for my science project in my backyard.

My research group studies mangrove forests. Which are vital coastal ecosystems that buffer infrastructure during extreme weather and support local fisheries. When I first began my internship at NASA in 2016. I had never heard of mangroves or learned about the scope of global forest losses. But I began reading news articles about a series of widespread mangrove losses occurring in the Gulf of Carpentaria in Australia. Thousands of hectares of forests died that year. And scientists didn’t gain a complete understanding of what caused the devastation until much later. I decided to build a program that could use satellite imagery to monitor the location and drivers of mangrove loss. Potentially helping to prevent another large-scale dieback in the future.

Google Earth Engine provided me with the scope of datasets. And computing power necessary to analyze forest change on a global scale. I began my project at NASA with no knowledge of satellites or image processing. But guidance from my mentors. Dr. David Lagomasino and Dr. Lola Fatoyinbo. And my intensive studying of the Earth Engine developer resources helped me move from endless notes and plans to actual working code.

In mapping past global mangrove losses and drivers. We used long term Landsat satellite imagery to identify regions of disturbance. Machine learning algorithms helped to identify where mangroves were converted to urban regions. Agriculture. Aquaculture or mudflats. Using the Earth Engine Apps interface. We’re working towards making our data both openly accessible and widely understandable for users of any background. Communicating our results at a comprehensible level is arguably as important as the science itself. As the ultimate goal of the project is to deliver our data to mangrove reliant communities on the ground.

After school This teen

The beginning stages of EcoMap, a global mangrove loss and vulnerability system.

We’re currently working with conservationists and researchers at:. The Everglades Foundation to use our mangrove loss driver data to understand the impacts of sea level rise and hurricanes in Everglades National Park. In the future. We also aim to provide coastal communities in East Africa with the real time loss and loss driver data necessary to sustainably manage and conserve local forests.

After school This teen tracks climate change with NASA.

My story is just one example of the impact of mentorship and resources on research development. Regardless of age. I entered my NASA project with a set of seemingly unattainable goals, and the combination of my mentors’ guidance and Earth Engine’s power helped to make them reality. As this field progresses. I am excited to continue using Earth Engine as a means of monitoring a changing planet. And balancing its needs with those of society.

After school This teen tracks climate change with NASA

Earthtopomaps.com

I first heard the words “climate change” when I was 9. Which are vital coastal ecosystems that buffer infrastructure during extreme weather and support local fisheries. When I first began my internship at NASA in 2016. But I began reading news articles about a series of widespread mangrove losses occurring in the Gulf of Carpentaria in Australia. And scientists didn’t gain a complete understanding of what caused the devastation until much later. Potentially helping to prevent another large-scale dieback in the future. We also aim to provide coastal communities in East Africa with the real time loss and loss driver data necessary to sustainably manage and conserve local forests.

I first heard the words “climate change” when I was 9. Which are vital coastal ecosystems that buffer infrastructure during extreme weather and support local fisheries. When I first began my internship at NASA in 2016. But I began reading news articles about a series of widespread mangrove losses occurring in the Gulf of Carpentaria in Australia. And scientists didn’t gain a complete understanding of what caused the devastation until much later. Potentially helping to prevent another large-scale dieback in the future. We also aim to provide coastal communities in East Africa with the real time loss and loss driver data necessary to sustainably manage and conserve local forests.

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