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Exploring home with Google Earth

Exploring home with Google Earth

This week we’re giving you a taste of what you can find in Voyager. A showcase of interactive tours and stories from experts. Nonprofits and more in the new Google Earth.

When you opened Google Earth for the very first time, where did you go?. For most people there’s a common destination:. We all want to see our home. The definition of “home” changes by country. Culture and climate.

Exploring home with Google Earth

In the Voyager story This is Home. You can explore how humans have adapted to their own unique landscapes across our planet by looking at the most personal of places. Visit igloos inhabited by generations of Inuit people long ago; listen to stories in the colorful home of Kancha Sherpa;. Or head to the desert and learn how an extended drought has changed the lives of the Bedouin people. Visit a welcoming and tightknit community in Greenland with more sheep than people.

Exploring home with Google
Exploring home with Google
Exploring home with Google
Exploring home with Google
Exploring home with Google

To tell these stories. We worked with partners and communities to digitally preserve homes of different cultures in Street View. The 360-degree imagery provides a snapshot in time of cultures facing economic, environmental and population pressures. For example. The Inuit people of Sanikiluaq have been building igloos for schoolchildren to learn in for decades. But in recent winters conditions haven’t been cold enough to create the right type of snow. It’s important to record this snapshot in time now. Because some of these lifestyles may be disappearing.

Check back in the coming months as we take you to dozens more homes and cultures. And thank you to the families who invited us into their homes and the partners who made it possible!.

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When you opened Google Earth for the very first time, where did you go?. Visit a welcoming and tightknit community in Greenland with more sheep than people. The 360-degree imagery provides a snapshot in time of cultures facing economic, environmental and population pressures. For example. But in recent winters conditions haven’t been cold enough to create the right type of snow. It’s important to record this snapshot in time now. Because some of these lifestyles may be disappearing.

A Street View salute to travel and tourism in the U.S.

A Street View salute to travel and tourism in the U.S.

A Street View salute

To celebrate National Travel and Tourism Week. Google Maps is releasing some new scenic Street View sights across the U.S. Collected with our partners in the Trekker Loan Program. In anticipation of the warm summer months ahead, discover. And explore botanical gardens tours. Historic boardwalks cruises and stunning city views all in your Google Maps app for Android and iOS.

A Street View salute to travel and tourism in the U.S.

Beginning our tour in Texas. Working with our partners at the Austin Convention and Visitors Bureau. You can take a summer dip in the pristine Hamilton Pool. A popular swimming hole for tourists and residents alike. Heading west to El Paso with our partners at Visit El Paso. You can take a breathtaking walk through Hueco Tanks State Park, where rock climbers and hikers delight in the winding trails through canyons filled with unique bird species. And botanicals. And for those in Houston, a stroll through Hermann Park thanks to Houston Parks Board. Provides a scenic getaway in the heart of the city where visitors can enjoy a bit of recreation. And relaxation. 

A Street View salute

Hamilton Pool, Austin, Texas

A Street View salute to travel and tourism in the U.S.

Heading east, you’ll find Mississippi’s scenic summer offerings from our partners at Visit Mississippi Gulf Coast. First you can enjoy the natural beauty of the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge. Where the endangered sandhill cranes hail during their migration patterns. You can also enjoy the afternoon sun at the Pascagoula Beach Park and Recreation Area.

A Street View salute

Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge

End your tour in the northwest. Where national parks are plentiful and the natural views will leave you breathless. In Oregon, with our partners at Travel Lane County. You can see the Heceta Head Lighthouse. The most photographed lighthouse on the West Coast. Then see if you can uncover the winding trail to Salt Creek Falls. Oregon’s second tallest waterfall.

A Street View salute

Heceta Head Lighthouse, Oregon

America’s unique history and beauty make it a great destination. To see more sites. Explore our U.S. Highlights Gallery.

Earthtopomaps.com

Where the endangered sandhill cranes hail during their migration patterns.

You can also enjoy the afternoon sun at the Pascagoula Beach Park and Recreation Area. Then see if you can uncover the winding trail to Salt Creek Falls.

Where the endangered sandhill cranes hail during their migration patterns. You can also enjoy the afternoon sun at the Pascagoula Beach Park and Recreation Area. Then see if you can uncover the winding trail to Salt Creek Falls.

Where the endangered sandhill cranes hail during their migration patterns.

You can also enjoy the afternoon sun at the Pascagoula Beach Park and Recreation Area. Then see if you can uncover the winding trail to Salt Creek Falls.

Where the endangered sandhill cranes hail during their migration patterns. You can also enjoy the afternoon sun at the Pascagoula Beach Park and Recreation Area. Then see if you can uncover the winding trail to Salt Creek Falls.

Where the endangered sandhill cranes hail during their migration patterns.

You can also enjoy the afternoon sun at the Pascagoula Beach Park and Recreation Area. Then see if you can uncover the winding trail to Salt Creek Falls.

Where the endangered sandhill cranes hail during their migration patterns. You can also enjoy the afternoon sun at the Pascagoula Beach Park and Recreation Area. Then see if you can uncover the winding trail to Salt Creek Falls.

Where the endangered sandhill cranes hail during their migration patterns.

You can also enjoy the afternoon sun at the Pascagoula Beach Park and Recreation Area. Then see if you can uncover the winding trail to Salt Creek Falls.

Where the endangered sandhill cranes hail during their migration patterns. You can also enjoy the afternoon sun at the Pascagoula Beach Park and Recreation Area. Then see if you can uncover the winding trail to Salt Creek Falls.

A Street View salute to travel and tourism in the U.S.

Welcome to Outer Space View

Welcome to Outer Space View.

Editor’s note.:  Starting today, you can now explore the International Space Station in Street View in Google Maps. Thomas Pesquet. Astronaut at the European Space Agency (ESA). Spent six months aboard the International Space Station (ISS) as a flight engineer. He returned to Earth in June 2017. And in this post he tells us about what it’s like to live on the ISS. And his experience capturing Street View imagery in zero gravity.  

Welcome to Outer Space View

In the six months that I spent on the International Space Station. It was difficult to find the words or take a picture that accurately describes the feeling of being in space. Working with Google on my latest mission. I captured Street View imagery to show what the ISS looks like from the inside. And share what it’s like to look down on Earth from outer space.

Welcome to Outer Space

Cupola Observation Module

For 16 years, astronauts have been working and living on the ISS. A structure made up of 15 connected modules that floats 250 miles above Earth. The ISS acts as a base for space exploration possible future missions to the Moon,Mars and asteroids—and gives us a unique perspective on Earth itself. We can collect data on the Earth’s oceans. Atmosphere. And land surface. We can conduct experiments and studies that we wouldn’t be able to do from Earth. Like monitoring how the human body reacts to microgravity. Solving mysteries of the immune system. Studying  cyclones in order to alert populations. And governments when a storm is approaching, or monitoring marine litter—the rapidly increasing amount of waste found in our oceans.

Welcome to Outer Space View

Welcome to Outer Space

US Laboratory Module

There were a few “firsts” on my mission. It was led by Peggy Whitson who. At age 56. Became the oldest woman to fly into space and the first woman in history to command two expeditions. The mission was the first time Street View imagery was captured beyond planet Earth, and the first time annotations helpful little notes that pop up as you explore the ISS have been added to the imagery. They provide additional information or fun facts like where we work out to stay physically fit. What kind of food we eat. And where we conduct scientific experiments.

Welcome to Outer Space

Node 1 (Unity) Peggy Whitson and friends dining at the galley table – big enough for six astronauts.

Because of the particular constraints of living and working in space, it wasn’t possible to collect Street View using Google’s usual methods. Instead. The Street View team worked with NASA at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. Texas and Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville. Alabama to design a gravity-free method of collecting the imagery using DSLR cameras. And equipment already on the ISS. Then I collected still photos in space. That were sent down to Earth where they were stitched together to create panoramic 360 degree imagery of the ISS.

Welcome to Outer Space

Node 2 (Harmony) Crew Quarters – Astronaut Sandra Magnus, Expedition 18 flight engineer, poses for a photo in her crew compartment.

We did a lot of troubleshooting before collecting the final imagery that you see today in Street View. The ISS has technical equipment on all surfaces, with lots of cables and a complicated layout with modules shooting off in all directions left. Right, up, down. And it’s a busy place. With six crew members carrying out research and maintenance activities 12 hours a day. There are a lot of obstacles up there, and we had limited time to capture the imagery. So we had to be confident that our approach would work. Oh, and there’s that whole zero gravity thing.

Welcome to Outer Space

Joint Airlock (Quest) – This area contains space suits also known as Extravehicular Mobility Units.  

They provide crew members with life support that enables extravehicular activity.

None of this would have been possible without the work of the team on the ground. My colleagues (turned roommates) on the ISS. And the countries that came together to send us up to space. Looking at Earth from above made me think about my own world a little differently, and I hope that the ISS on Street View changes your view of the world too.

Click here to go behind the scenes with Thomas and the team.

Earthtopomaps

Welcome to Outer Space View

Studying  cyclones in order to alert populations. And governments when a storm is approaching, or monitoring marine litter—the rapidly increasing amount of waste found in our oceans. Because of the particular constraints of living and working in space, it wasn’t possible to collect Street View using Google’s usual methods. Instead. Then I collected still photos in space. We did a lot of troubleshooting before collecting the final imagery that you see today in Street View. So we had to be confident that our approach would work.

Studying  cyclones in order to alert populations. And governments when a storm is approaching, or monitoring marine litter—the rapidly increasing amount of waste found in our oceans. Because of the particular constraints of living and working in space, it wasn’t possible to collect Street View using Google’s usual methods. Instead. Then I collected still photos in space. We did a lot of troubleshooting before collecting the final imagery that you see today in Street View. So we had to be confident that our approach would work.

Studying  cyclones in order to alert populations.

And governments when a storm is approaching, or monitoring marine litter—the rapidly increasing amount of waste found in our oceans. Because of the particular constraints of living and working in space, it wasn’t possible to collect Street View using Google’s usual methods. Instead. Then I collected still photos in space. We did a lot of troubleshooting before collecting the final imagery that you see today in Street View. So we had to be confident that our approach would work.

Studying  cyclones in order to alert populations. And governments when a storm is approaching, or monitoring marine litter—the rapidly increasing amount of waste found in our oceans. Because of the particular constraints of living and working in space, it wasn’t possible to collect Street View using Google’s usual methods. Instead. Then I collected still photos in space. We did a lot of troubleshooting before collecting the final imagery that you see today in Street View. So we had to be confident that our approach would work.

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